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Welcome to Ms. Waugh's Class Blog

Welcome students, parents, and colleagues. Thank you for visiting my blog. This blog I have designed to introduce myself and inform you about what is going on in my classes. Currently, I teach ESL inclusion for grades 6 an d7.

Let's get ready to learn!

Bienvenidos estudiantes, padres, y colegas. Gracias por visitar mi blog. Este blog que he diseñado para presentarle informacion acerca de mi y lo que pasa en mis clases. Ahora, enseño el idioma de ingles en grados 6 y 7.

¡Preparemos para aprender!

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Monday, May 23, 2011

SIOP Lesson Plans Spring Unit



Unit Topic:
Spring
Lesson Title:
Blue Jays
Class: Second Grade Small Group
Sarah Greenwood K-8, Dorchester
Two students ELD Level 1
Two students ELD level 2
Date:
May 2011
Unit Theme: Students will become familiar with language about spring including nature and animals. They will be able to identify the characteristics of spring and identify key vocabulary in texts and the real world.
Standards: (MA Curriculum Frameworks)
GENERAL STANDARD 4: Vocabulary and Concept Development
4.3 Identify and sort common words into conceptual categories (opposites, living things).
GENERAL STANDARD 7: Beginning Reading
7.7 Use letter-sound knowledge to decode written English
GENERAL STANDARD 8: Understanding a Text
8.6 Make predictions about what will happen next in a story, and explain whether they were confirmed or disconfirmed and why.
8.7 Retell a story’s beginning, middle, and end.
8.8 Distinguish cause from effect.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY BENCHMARKS AND OUTCOMES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS:
  Understand selected essential grade level content vocabulary using pictures, actions and/or objects (S.1.3)
  Understand simple story or poem by using prior knowledge and/or visual cues (S.3.4)
  Retells events is a simple story using basic and complex sentences (S.3.16)
  Participate in rhyming games and activities (R.2.4e)
  List new words and phrases related to the topic of a writing task. (W.1.2b)
  Draws or sequences pictures to tell or retell a story. (W.2.4a)

Content Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·      Read/listen to Blue Jays book level G
·      Identify animals and nature in the book
·      Identify characteristics of spring
Language Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·      Summarize the plot of the book
·      Describe orally life in springtime, using animal and nature vocabulary
·      Find rhymes in the text and read them aloud

Key Vocabulary:
·      Blue jay
·      tree
·      leaves
·      sprout
·      nest
·      baby birds
·      worm
Key Grammatical Structures/
Uses of Language:
·       rhymes

Higher Order Question:
What is spring and how is it different in the United States than the student’s home country?
Materials:
·       Blue Jays, level G
·       Graphic Organizer for activating background knowledge about spring
·       Post-its for vocabulary
·       Outdoor classroom

Learning Strategies:
·       Activate background knowledge
·       Summarize
·        Imagine with keywords
·       Group/classify
·       Use imagery
Lesson Overview:
Spring is a season of new life and growth. It is a very vocabulary-driven unit, which can be beneficial for ELLs because the vocabulary is concrete and reinforced through pictures and text. In this lesson, students will share what they know about spring and be introduced to the season in a guided reading activity. Students will also explore rhyming with the lyrical prose of the story.

Motivation:
(Building Background)

Learning Strategies:
Activate background knowledge, group/classify, use imagery

·      Show a picture/poster scene of spring. Ask students to identify the season and point out what they see (ie. birds, trees.) in English.
·      Label with the vocabulary with post-its.
·      The lesson vocabulary they cannot name in English, provide for them, making a post-it and having students repeat the word with you.
·      Ask students to share what spring is like in their home country.
Presentation:
(Language and content objectives, comprehensible input, strategies, interaction, feedback)
Learning strategies:
Activate background knowledge, imagine with keywords
·      Tell students that today they will be reading a book about Blue Jays, which are a kind of bird.
·      Introduce guided reading book Blue Jays level G
·      Do a picture walk with the students, previewing nature vocabulary in the pictures
·      Point out rhyming words
Practice and Application:
(Meaningful activities, interaction, strategies, practice and application, feedback)
·      Read the book in guided reading. Students who are able to read the text read it alone and aloud. Students who are unable to read text read aloud with teacher.
·      Following reading the text, make a graphic organizer of aspects of spring the students found in the text.
·      As a group, have students look for rhyming words and make a list of all rhyming words.
·      Have students share a summary of the story in partners. Students who are unable to articulate a summary will be asked to identify vocabulary in the pictures of the story.
·      In partners, give students post-its and using the graphic organizer for support, ask students to label vocabulary in the pictures in the book
Review and Assessment:
(Review objectives and vocabulary, assess learning)
·      Formal assessment: checking the individual work
·      Informal assessment: verbal responses and participation
·      Students will create a poster to summarize the book, using vocabulary and imagery of spring from Blue Jays. Students will label the vocabulary they drew.
·      Students who are able will write a sentence or two in summary to accompany the poster.
·      Students will share their posters with the rest of the class and present them orally, pointing out what is happening in their spring scene and what vocabulary they used.
Extension:
·  Students will add the book Blue Jays to their independent reading bag for future review and re-reading.

Spring Poem

Out of cave! Out of hole!
Bear, rabbit, little mole,
Hatch from egg in nest in trees!
The birds are back and so are bees.
The flowers bloom. The leaves are green.
How do they know when it's spring?

Build your web! The bugs are back!
Little spider dressed in black.
Bears, rabbits, birds and bees,
Flowers, grass and trees,
Just like me their face is warm,
That's how they know spring has come.

Unit Topic:
Spring
Lesson Title:
Spring Poetry
Class: Second Grade Small Group
Sarah Greenwood K-8, Dorchester
Two students ELD Level 1
Two students ELD level 2
Date:
May 2011
Unit Theme: Students will become familiar with language about spring including nature and animals. They will be able to identify the characteristics of spring and identify key vocabulary in texts and the real world.
Standards: (MA Curriculum Frameworks)
GENERAL STANDARD 14: Poetry
14.1 Identify a regular beat and similarities of sounds in words in responding to rhythm and rhyme in poetry.
GENERAL STANDARD 4: Vocabulary and Concept Development
4.3 Identify and sort common words into conceptual categories (opposites, living things).
GENERAL STANDARD 7: Beginning Reading
7.7 Use letter-sound knowledge to decode written English
GENERAL STANDARD 8: Understanding a Text
8.7 Retell a story’s beginning, middle, and end.
8.8 Distinguish cause from effect.
Strand: Life Science (Biology)
7. Recognize changes in appearance that animals and plants go through as the seasons change.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY BENCHMARKS AND OUTCOMES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS:
       Understands selected essential grade level content vocabulary using pictures, actions and/or objects (S.1.3)
       Understands simple story or poem by using prior knowledge and/or visual cues (S.3.4)
       Retells events is a simple story using basic and complex sentences (S.3.16)
       Participates in rhyming games and activities (R.2.4e)
       Lists new words and phrases related to the topic of a writing task. (W.1.2b)
Content Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·      Read/listen to a poem titled “Spring”
·      Identify animals and nature in the poem
·      Identify characteristics of spring
Language Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·       Summarize the poem
·       Describe orally life in springtime, using animal and nature vocabulary
·      Find rhymes in the text and read them aloud
Key Vocabulary:
·      hibernation
·      cave
·      bear
·      rabbit
·      mole
·      hatch
·      bloom
·      web
·      spider
Key Grammatical Structures/
Uses of Language:
·      rhymes

Higher Order Question:
Why is spring important in the life cycle of animals?
Materials:
·       “Spring” poem
·       Prepared flash-card photos of a bear, rabbit, mole and spider
·       Paper for poster
·       Highlighters
Learning Strategies:
·       Activate background knowledge
·       Summarize
·        Imagine with keywords
·       Group/classify
·       Use imagery
Lesson Overview:
Students will explore a spring poem in this lesson. They will learn and discuss the term hibernation and what it means. Students will read the poem and learn the spring vocabulary within the poem. Students will practice reading with fluency and identifying rhyming words.
Motivation:
(Building Background)




Learning Strategies:
Activate background knowledge, group/classify
·      Ask students “what is a poem?” If no student volunteers the information, make sure they know a poem is a musical story that often rhymes. Pass out copies of the poem and have students work in partners to highlight the words that rhyme. Go over the rhyming words.
·      Show the students the flashcards with the animal names on them. Have each student practice saying the name of the animal in English.
Presentation:
(Language and content objectives, comprehensible input, strategies, interaction, feedback)

Learning strategies:
Use imagery
·      Read the poem to the students.
·      For the students who are able to read, have them take turns re-reading it aloud, alternating lines.
·      As you read the poem, show the flashcards with the pictures of the animals.
·      Have the students who are unable to read hold up the animal flashcards when they hear the animals named in the poem.
Practice and Application:
(Meaningful activities, interaction, strategies, practice and application, feedback)

Learning strategies:
Summarize
·      Discussion: what is the poem about? Have each student re-tell the poem and/or re-read the poem in partners.
o   The students should be able to discern it is about animals being born or coming out of hibernation in spring.
·      Discuss the term “hibernation” and what it means. Make a graphic organizer of animals that hibernate and then wake up in spring.

Review and Assessment:
(Review objectives and vocabulary, assess learning)
·      Formal assessment: checking the individual work
·      Informal assessment: verbal responses and participation
·      Students will complete a worksheet in which they must label the vocabulary in the poem.
·      Students who are able to will be expected to give an oral summary or a written summary of the poem.
Extension:
·  Students will illustrate the poem.
 

Unit Topic:
Spring
Lesson Title:
Spring Weather
Class: Second Grade Small Group
Sarah Greenwood K-8, Dorchester
Two students ELD Level 1
Two students ELD level 2
Date:
May 2011
Unit Theme: Students will become familiar with language about spring including nature and animals. They will be able to identify the characteristics of spring and identify key vocabulary in texts and the real world.
Standards: (MA Curriculum Frameworks)
Strand: Life Science (Biology)
7. Recognize changes in appearance that animals and plants go through as the seasons change.
S T R A N D: E A R T H A N D S P A C E S C I E N C E
3. Weather changes from day to day and over the seasons.
GENERAL STANDARD 4: Vocabulary and Concept Development
4.3 Identify and sort common words into conceptual categories (opposites, living things).
4.4 Identify base words (look) and their inflectional forms (looks, looked, looking).
ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY BENCHMARKS AND OUTCOMES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS:
  Understand selected essential grade level content vocabulary using pictures, actions and/or objects (S.1.3)
  Understands oral questions that are based on academic content. (S.3.30)
  Asks and/or answers concrete questions about familiar topics (S.2.5)
Content Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·      Describe how weather changes from day to day
·      Identify different weather scenarios
·      Describe the weather in springtime in Boston
·      Add suffixes to nouns to describe the weather
Language Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·      Pronounce weather vocabulary and use appropriately
·      Participate in asking and responding to orally questions about the weather
·      Label weather vocabulary both written and orally
·      Sing a song about the weather
Key Vocabulary:
·      sunny/sun
·      rainy/rain
·      windy/win
·      storm
·      hot/cold/warm/cool
·      cloudy/cloud
·      summer/winter/spring/autumn
·      frosty/frost
·      foggy/fog
·      snowing/snow
·      blowing/blow
Key Grammatical Structures/Uses of Language:
·       suffixes
·       “What’s the weather like today?”

Higher Order Question:
 What weather do we experience during springtime in Boston?
Materials:
·       Weather Song
·       Rain, Rain, Go Away Song:
·       Weather flashcards
·       Weather worksheet
·       Blank bingo boards
·       Suffixes worksheet
Learning Strategies:
·       Activate background knowledge
·       Summarize
·        Imagine with keywords
·       Group/classify
·       Use imagery
Lesson Overview:
 In this lesson, students will review weather and discuss the weather that takes place in springtime. In Boston, students can experience every kind of weather during spring and students will practice asking each other and identifying the weather.
Motivation:
(Building Background)

Learning Strategies:
Activate background knowledge, imagine with keywords

·       Students will watch the video “What’s the Weather?” and repeat the vocabulary as they are introduced in the song.
·      Students will listen to the song a few times and then be expected to join along.
·      Students will then look out the window and answer the question, “What is the weather like today?”
·      In pairs, students will use weather flashcards to practice asking, “What is the Weather Like?” and responding using appropriate vocabulary answering, “What’s the weather?”
Presentation:
(Language and content objectives, comprehensible input, strategies, interaction, feedback)

Learning strategies:
Group/classify
Use imagery
·      Today students will reinforce the weather vocabulary by playing a bingo game that gets them interacting with the different aspects of weather.
·      Students will draw different weather scenarios into a blank bingo board.
·      Then they will take turns asking the teacher, “What’s the weather?” and the teacher will draw random weather cards and say the various weather possibilities.
·      Students will mark the bingo boards and play until someone gets five in a row.
Practice and Application:
(Meaningful activities, interaction, strategies, practice and application, feedback)
·       After one teacher-led round, students who are low-English producers will continue to play the game in pairs.
·      Higher performing students will engage in a mini-lesson with the teacher about weather suffixes. The teacher will introduce the different forms of the word “rain:” including “rainy” and “raining” and conduct a discussion about the differences between these words. The students will then complete a table, adding the correct suffix to each weather vocabulary word.
Review and Assessment:
(Review objectives and vocabulary, assess learning)
·      Formal assessment: checking the individual work
·      Informal assessment: verbal responses and participation
·       As an assessment, students will label blank flashcards for themselves.
·      If necessary, the students can listen to the song again for reinforcement
Extension:
·  Ask students what type of weather we have been having in Boston for the past month? Rain! Show them the song, “Rain, Rain, go away” and invite students to sing along.


Unit Topic:
Spring
Lesson Title:
Baby Animals
Class: Second Grade Small Group
Sarah Greenwood K-8, Dorchester
Two students ELD Level 1
Two students ELD level 2
Date:
May 2011
Unit Theme: Students will become familiar with language about spring including nature and animals. They will be able to identify the characteristics of spring and identify key vocabulary in texts and the real world.
Standards: (MA Curriculum Frameworks)
Strand: Life Science (Biology)
7. Recognize changes in appearance that animals and plants go through as the seasons change.
GENERAL STANDARD 4: Vocabulary and Concept Development
4.3 Identify and sort common words into conceptual categories (opposites, living things).
ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY BENCHMARKS AND OUTCOMES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS:
  Understand selected essential grade level content vocabulary using pictures, actions and/or objects (S.1.3)
  List new words and phrases related to the topic of a writing task. (W.1.2b)
  Describes how two things within academic content are alike or different (S.3.40)
Content Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·      Identify animals and their corresponding babies
·      Classify animals according to their offspring
Language Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·       Pronounce and say animal names and baby names orally

Key Vocabulary:
·       kitten/cat
·      puppy/dog
·      chick/chicken
·      cub/lion
·      calf/cow
·      kid/goat
·      lamb/sheep
·      foal/horse
·      duckling/duck
·      piglet/pig
Higher Order Question:
Why is springtime important in the life cycle of animals?
Materials:
·       animal and baby flashcards
·       animal and baby matching worksheets

Learning Strategies:
·       Activate background knowledge
·        Imagine with keywords
·       Group/classify
·       Use imagery
Lesson Overview:
An important part of spring is the birth of baby animals. Knowing animal names and their baby names is important and in this lesson, students will do activities in which they match animals to their babies.
Motivation:
(Building Background)

Learning Strategies:
Building background knowledge
Brainstorming
Discussion
·       Make a T-chart of all the animals the students can list and their baby’s names
·      If students cannot name an animal and its baby, either or is fine
·      Tell students many baby animals are not named the same as their parents, just like “adult” is what we call grown-ups and we call baby people “children” or “kids.”
·      Ask students why we might be talking about baby animals during springtime? If no student can answer the question, tell the students that springtime is when baby animals are born.
Presentation:
(Language and content objectives, comprehensible input, strategies, interaction, feedback)


Learning strategies:
Imagine with keywords
Group/classify
Use imagery
·      Introduce the flashcards for animals and their babies. Introduce the animal flashcards first and ask students if they know the names of the baby.
·      Lay the baby cards out on the table and have the students locate the baby card when you hold up the corresponding adult animal card. Have the students practice saying both animal names.
·      Once the students identify the baby animal and its parent, set the cards aside, next to each other until all sets have been identified.
·      Once all of the sets have been identified, repeat the animal and baby names, asking individual students to volunteer to read the cards. 
Practice and Application:
(Meaningful activities, interaction, strategies, practice and application, feedback)
·      Divide the class into pairs. Distribute the cards evenly so each pair gets a few sets of animal and baby cards. Have the pairs play a modified version of “memory” in which they lay all the cards face down and have to find the parent animal and baby animal sets. Encourage students to say the name of the animals each time they turn over a card.
·      Students who finish the game early can play a modified version of “go-fish” using the same cards.
Review and Assessment:
(Review objectives and vocabulary, assess learning)
·      Formal assessment: checking the individual work
·      Informal assessment: verbal responses and participation
·      Students will complete a matching worksheet in which they match the adult animals to the baby animals.
·      The students will complete different worksheets depending on their English levels. The first worksheet will need students to first label the animal and baby names and then match the pictures to the words.
·      The lower-level variation will already have the pictures labeled; these students will just need to match the parent animal to the baby animal.
·      Each student will be assessed individually to say the animal name orally.
Extension:
·  Return to the T-chart you made at the beginning of class. Ask students to add or revise the animal and baby entries they made earlier.
·  If time remains, students will swap flashcards with another group and play another round of go-fish or memory











 
Unit Topic:
Spring
Lesson Title:
Haiku
Class: Second Grade Small Group
Sarah Greenwood K-8, Dorchester
Two students ELD Level 1
Two students ELD level 2
Date:
May 2011
Unit Theme: Students will become familiar with language about spring including nature and animals. They will be able to identify the characteristics of spring and identify key vocabulary in texts and the real world.
Standards: (MA Curriculum Frameworks)
GENERAL STANDARD 14: Poetry
14.1 Identify a regular beat and similarities of sounds in words in responding to rhythm and rhyme in poetry.
GENERAL STANDARD 4: Vocabulary and Concept Development
4.3 Identify and sort common words into conceptual categories (opposites, living things).
GENERAL STANDARD 7: Beginning Reading
7.7 Use letter-sound knowledge to decode written English
GENERAL STANDARD 8: Understanding a Text
8.7 Retell a story’s beginning, middle, and end.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY BENCHMARKS AND OUTCOMES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS:
  Understand selected essential grade level content vocabulary using pictures, actions and/or objects (S.1.3)
  Understand simple story or poem by using prior knowledge and/or visual cues (S.3.4)
  Retells events is a simple story using basic and complex sentences (S.3.16)
  Participate in rhyming games and activities (R.2.4e)
  List new words and phrases related to the topic of a writing task. (W.1.2b)
  Selects words for writing that add detail. (W.3.3)
Content Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·      Read/listen to a spring Haiku
·      Identify animals and nature in the Haiku
·      Identify characteristics of spring
·      Write a Haiku with spring vocabulary
Language Objectives:
Students will be able to…
·      Describe orally and in writing life in springtime, using animal and nature vocabulary
·      Read fluently a Haiku
·      Identify syllables in words in English and use this understanding to write a Haiku
Key Vocabulary:
·       Haiku
·      Previously taught spring vocabulary
·      “I spy with my little eye…”
Key Grammatical Structures/Uses of Language:
·       Syllables
·       Haiku poem
Higher Order Question:
What is a Haiku poem and how can we use it to describe spring?
Materials:
·       Outdoor classroom
·       Spring Haiku
·       Spring Haiku skeletons
Learning Strategies:
·       Activate background knowledge
·       Summarize
·        Imagine with keywords
·       Group/classify
·       Use imagery
Lesson Overview:
This lesson will take place near the end of the unit, after all unit vocabulary has been practiced and mastered. Students will explore the Haiku style of poetry, reading a Haiku I wrote and then writing their own. Students will use the outdoor classroom as inspiration.
Motivation:
(Building Background)





Learning Strategies:
Building background knowledge, use imagery

·      Students will go outside to the outdoor classroom and play “I spy with my little eye…” This game will be a review of spring vocabulary and a chance for them to interact with the vocabulary in context: trees, flowers, birds, sun, clouds, sky
·      After the warm-up game, introduce the spring Haiku and read it aloud to the students. Explain Haiku is a type of Japanese poem with a specific number of words/syllables in each line. Haikus are often about spring, which is why the students today will be writing spring Haikus of their own.
Presentation:
(Language and content objectives, comprehensible input, strategies, interaction, feedback)


Learning strategies:
Summarizing
·      Distribute copies of the poem and have students work in pairs to determine the number of syllables in each line. (They should find the first line has five, the middle line has seven and the last line has five.)
·      Students who are unable to read will be paired with students who can read, so that all students will be involved and able to participate. 
·      Have each student practice reading the poem aloud to his or her partner.
·      Ask the students to summarize the poem to their partners and have the partners identify spring vocabulary.
Practice and Application:
(Meaningful activities, interaction, strategies, practice and application, feedback)
·      At this time students will begin writing poems of their own.
·      Higher-level students will write the poems on their own on lined paper
·      Lower-level students will have a Haiku skeleton paper so they write the poem in the specific format
·      Students who produce no English will be given the Haiku poem skeleton and the words from the poem out of order and will be expected to order the words correctly to reform the poem.
Review and Assessment:
(Review objectives and vocabulary, assess learning)
·      Formal assessment: checking the individual work
·      Informal assessment: verbal responses and participation
·      If time, students will illustrate their poems.
·      The teacher will edit each poem for grammar and spelling and then the students will share their poems aloud with the class.
Extension:
·  Students will write a second Haiku poem incorporated other spring vocabulary

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